September’s Farming for Justice discussion was led by Alexas Esposito and Joe Soto of the Traditional Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Healing(TCIKH). They shared their approach to returning to nature to heal their communities and themselves from intergenerational trauma through the technical and spiritual significance of seeds.

In this video you will get a comprehensive tour of the farm at TCIKH in 2020 at the height of the season, and how starting, tending and saving these seeds is a healing, spiritual, and educational experience. 

“It’s the seeds that bring us together. It’s the seeds that hold us together. It’s the seeds that keep us growing.”
-Alexas Esposito

More about the The Traditional Center For Indigenous
Knowledge & Healing:

“As Indigenous people, our way is to honor our traditions, culture, and ceremonies as a way of life. The Traditional Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Healing (TCIKH) is a refuge for people to find safety, and a space for their healing. Our focus is in helping all those who come; making it a space safe for women and children that is our first priority. It is a humble refuge, surrounded by dozens of acres of wooded land, which is surrounded by state forest land.Our aim is to help our people heal through the sharing of knowledge and healing modalities, and the practice of sovereignty through traditional community roles and values, which is a matrilineal way of life.”

To learn more about The Traditional Center for Indigenous Knowledge and Healing please visit the website: https://www.tcikh.org/
We also encourage you to donate directly to their efforts.

We are pleased to continue offering Farming for Justice (FFJ) Discussions for free because of grant funds and donations. If you watch the video, please take a moment to complete this brief survey about the session! We value your feedback!

We also hope that you consider making a donation to Groundswell so we can keep this discussion free and compensate presenters fairly.

 Thank you!